CB RADIO ANTENNA – 15.5 DBi Beam

CB RADIO ANTENNA – 15.5 DBi @1.3:1 SWR Max

CB RADIO ANTENNA - 15.5 DBi @1.3:1 SWR Max
CB RADIO ANTENNA – 15.5 DBi @1.3:1 SWR Max
LONGSHOT CB RADIO ANTENNA MODEL: 5 WIRE LONGSHOT BEAM CB Antenna

CB Radio Base Beam Antenna

  1. Number of Wire Elements 5
  2. Longest Element (ft) 18′
  3. Length total (ft) 25′
  4. 100 Wind Survival (mph)
  5. (Meters) 11
  6. Gain (db) 15.5
  7. Power Multiplication 40X
  8. Front-to-Back Sep. (db) 31
  9. VSWR (adjustable) 1.3:1 Max

Click Here For LONGSHOT 5 Element Beam Specifications:

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A resonant half-wave dipole is typically fed with coaxial feed-line and tuned to a specific CB radio area of a LONG WIRE ANTENNA band. Its planned use is generally within that HF ANTENNA band. Popular because the LONGSHOT dipole is resonant, or because the base antenna feed-line is small in diameter, a balun is not helpful. Current base antenna baluns isolate or add impedance to uninvited common-mode current paths, reducing or controlling common-mode CB antenna current.

Basically, they ensure that the currents on each side of the dipole (balanced RF) are perfectly even. This also stops unwanted currents from flowing on the outside of the coax (all dipole coax is unbalanced CB line) and traveling back to your radio receiver through your CB beam. This ensures a “clean” system without unwanted CB beam RFI issues.

ANTENNA MODEL: 5 WIRE LONGSHOT BEAM CB Antenna

CB Directional Aerial Operational Characteristics

The antenna, also known as the Yagi-Uda antenna, Yagi, or directional aerial, was invented in 1920 by a two Japanese scientists, Doctors Yagi and Uda, while experimenting with CB radio antennas. Dipole antennas are the simplest forms of CB radio antennas and use one piece of wire or a single element. Old-style television antennas that are mounted on rooftops are one example of this type antenna.

Using a directional antenna to transmit a signal works in the same way. The directional antenna is pointed in the direction that the transmitter wants the signal to go. The signal goes from the transmitter or transceiver, through the feedline, to the center element in the feedpoint. The directors send the signal in the direction it needs to go while the reflectors reflect back any signal that would be lost toward the smaller elements to be sent out.

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